Chamomile oil (Matricaria Chamomile)


Chamomile oil (Matricaria Chamomile)

German chamomile (Matricaria chamomile), which is often referred to as blue chamomile or true chamomile, comes from the Compositae sunflower family. It is one of the two chamomile species that can be used medicinally. The other one is the Roman or English chamomile (Chamamelum nobile).

This plant, which hails from Southern and Eastern parts of Europe, grows from 60 centimeters up to 16 inches tall with heavily branched and furrowed stems. Like Roman chamomile oil, German chamomile essential oil is extracted either through solvent extraction or steam distillation of its golden yellow flowers that have ray-like blossoms.

Uses of German Chamomile Oil:

German chamomile oil is broadly used in the cosmetic industry, especially in formulations designed to improve dry, inflamed, or irritated skin. It is also added in shampoos and conditioners.

Other practical uses of German chamomile oil include:

Hair moisturizer — Blend two drops of German chamomile oil, rosemary oil, and lavender oil with four tablespoons of sweet almond oil. Massage it onto your hair and scalp once a week. For best results, leave it on overnight.

Moisturizing skin mist — To make your own natural skin mist, blend two drops of German chamomile oil, two drops of lavender oil, one drop of rose otto oil, and four ounces of purified water in a ready-to-spray bottle. This natural moisturizing mist will surely be handy for your sunbathing sessions.

May help relieve migraine — Moisten a towel with cool water and add a few drops of German chamomile oil. Place the damp cloth on your forehead, close your eyes, and relax.

May provide relief from joint pain or tense, stiff, and cramping muscles – Blend two tablespoons of sweet almond oil and two drops of German chamomile oil and rosemary oil. Massage this blend onto the affected areas to ease up the tensed muscles and increase circulation.

Skin toner — German chamomile oil has astringent properties, which makes it ideal for pore-cleansing treatment. Simply add the essential oil to your own homemade facial cleanser and apply using cotton balls.

Composition of German Chamomile Oil:

Some of the chemical components of German chamomile oil include chamazulene, farnesene, sesquiterpenes, cadinene, furfural, spanthulenol, and proazulenes (matricarin and matricin). Chamazulene (or azulen when isolated), which provides German chamomile oil its deep bluish color, is formed from matricin during steam distillation. Prolonged storage and light exposure destroys this effect. This often results in a lighter blue color, which can turn into a pale green, yellow, or even brown shade.

When it’s still fresh, German chamomile oil has a viscous quality and has a sweet, herbaceous scent with fruity undertones. However, in its concentrated and dried-out form, German chamomile oil can sometimes be nauseating and unpleasant for some individuals.

German chamomile oil blends well with rose oil, lavender oil, cedar oil, neroli oil, and geranium oil.